1.1.A.75 Appropriate state or territory body (ACCS (child wellbeing))

Definition

For the purpose of notifications for ACCS (child wellbeing), an 'appropriate state or territory body' is:

  • a department or agency of the state or territory that is responsible for dealing with matters relating to the welfare of children, or
  • an organisation dealing with such matters on behalf of such a department or agency in accordance with an agreement between the department or agency and the organisation.

Implementation

In practice, organisations can be considered appropriate if:

  • they are
    • a state or territory department or agency,
    • funded or part-funded by the state or territory,
    • otherwise supported or endorsed by the state or territory,
  • and if they support families with regard to the following matters:
    • parenting assistance including family support programs,
    • interpersonal conflict, separation, mediation services,
    • child and maternal health services, including antenatal services,
    • drug or alcohol or substance abuse services,
    • community health services including publicly funded general practitioner services (but not private services), mental health services, counselling services, women's health services, bereavement counselling services (psychology or social work), psychiatric services or palliative care services,
    • domestic violence, rape victim support or other similar support services (including state or territory police),
    • homelessness, crisis or public housing services,
    • financial and gambling counselling services,
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and support services,
    • school readiness programs, school counsellors and other education related 'secondary services',
    • other early intervention services,
    • child protection agency.

Act reference: FA(Admin)Act section 204K Notice to State/Territory body of child at risk of serious abuse or neglect

Policy reference: FA Guide 2.8.1.60 ACCS (child wellbeing) - Giving Notice

Last reviewed: 2 July 2018