10.9.100 Irish Glossary

Introduction

This section contains definitions of terms applicable to the Agreement with Ireland.

Australian Disability Support Pension/Disability Support Pension

When the Agreement was negotiated, DSP was known as 'invalid pension'. The Agreement therefore covers DSP for both the severely disabled and the non-severely disabled.

Australian Parenting Payment (Single)/Parenting Payment (Single)

Under the Agreement PPS is limited to legal (de jure) widows. Other categories of lone parents (single parents, males etc) are not covered under this Agreement.

Australian Widow B Pension/Widow B Pension

Under the Agreement, WidB is limited to legal (de jure) widows. Other categories of widow B pensioners (divorcees, dependent females etc) are not covered under this Agreement.

WidB must not be granted unless the woman's claim for the pension was lodged before 20 March 1997 and the woman is qualified for the pension before that day. This does not apply when the Secretary makes a determination to resume a woman's WidB under SSAct section 401 after it has been cancelled or suspended under sections 400, 400A or 400B. However, a woman on an autonomous WidB is still able to transfer to an agreement WidB overseas. In the latter situation, the transfer does not involve a new grant of WidB.

Australian Wife Pension/Wife Pension

After 30 June 1995, WP cannot be granted, even under an agreement. An autonomous wife pensioner can transfer to an agreement WP (when an agreement covers this concurrent entitlement) as this is not classified as a 'new grant' of WP. Wife pensions granted under the Agreement before 1 July 1995 continue to be paid outside Australia. WP can ONLY be paid under the Agreement to a woman who has been an Australian resident at some time.

Benefit

Benefit, for Australia, means a pension, benefit or allowance payable under Australian social security legislation as specified in Article 2 of the Agreement. It also includes any additional amount or increase that is payable to a person who qualifies for that increase. RA, PhA, TAL and RAA are payable to people inside Australia, but are subject to the portability restrictions of the SSAct for people outside Australia.

Ireland

Ireland is the Republic of Ireland. It excludes Northern Ireland which is part of the UK.

Irish Bereavement Grant

A bereavement grant is a once-off payment based on PRSI contributions which is payable on the death of:

  • an insured person,
  • the wife or husband of an insured person,
  • the widow or widower of an insured person,
  • a contributory pensioner(or spouse of a contributory pensioner),
  • a child under 18, or under age 22 if in full-time education (where either parent or the person that the child normally lives with satisfies the PRSI contribution conditions),
  • the qualified adult of a contributory pensioner, including those who would be qualified but are in receipt of another social welfare payment, e.g. Carers Allowance,
  • a qualified child,
  • an orphan or a person to whom an orphan's (contributory) allowance is payable.

The scheme was introduced in 1999 as a replacement for the former Death Grant scheme.

Irish Invalidity Pension

To receive this payment a person must:

  • be permanently incapable of work because of illness or injury,
  • be incapable of work for at least 12 months and be incapable of work for at least a further 12 months, or
  • be permanently incapable of work, OR, over age 60 and suffering from a serious illness or incapacity,
  • have a total of 260 weeks PRSI, and
  • 48 weeks PRSI paid or credited in the last complete tax year before claiming.

More information on invalidity pension is available from the Department of Social Protection website.

Irish Old Age (Contributory) Pension

To receive an old-age pension a person must:

  • have started paying PRSI before reaching age 56,
  • have at least 156 full rate employment contributions paid or if the yearly average is between 10 and 19, at least 269 full rate employment contributions, and
  • a yearly average of at least 48 full rate contributions paid/or credited from 1979 to the end of the tax year when they reach 66. This entitles the person to the 'maximum' rate of pension if the person reached 66 on or before 6 April 1992. To receive a 'minimum' rate of pension, a person must have at least 10 full rate contributions paid and/or credited from 1953 (or the time the person started insurable employment) to the end of the tax year before they reach 66.

People who turn 66 from 6 April 2002 to 5 April 2012 must have at least 260 full-rate PRSI contributions.

People who turn 66 on or after 6 April 2012 must have at least 520 full-rate PRSI contributions. If the person has at least 260 full-rate PRSI contributions paid the balance can be made up with high rate voluntary contributions.

More information on old-age pension is available from the Department of Social Protection website.

Irish Orphan's (Contributory) Allowance

Orphan's allowance may be paid for a child where the parent, step-parent or person who supported the child dies as a result of an accident at work or an occupational disease, or if the person was getting a disablement pension assessed at 50% or more at the time of their death.

A child is considered an orphan if:

  • both parents are dead, or
  • one parent is dead, unknown, has abandoned or refused or failed to provide for the child and the other parent is unknown, has abandoned or refused or failed to provide for the child.

The orphan's guardian should claim the pension.

More information on orphan's pension is available from the Department of Social Protection website.

Irish Period of Insurance

Means a period in respect of which qualifying PRSI contributions have been paid or credited and can be used to qualify for a benefit from Ireland. They do not include any period of residence in Australia which is deemed to be an Irish period of insurance by Article 10. See also PRSI and PRSI Credits.

Irish Retirement Pension

To receive a retirement pension a person must:

  • be aged 65,
  • retired from full-time employment, and
  • have at least 156 full rate PRSI contributions. The person must have started paying these contributions before reaching 55 years of age. To receive a 'maximum' pension, the person must have a yearly average of 48 full rate employment contributions paid and/or credited from 1979 to the end of the tax year when they turn 65, or, a yearly average of at least 24 full rate employment contributions paid and/or credited from 1953 (or when the person started work) to the end of the tax year before they reach 65. A yearly average of 24 full rate contributions entitles a person to a 'minimum' rate of retirement pension.

To receive a maximum rate of pension:

  • people who turn 65 from 6 April 2002 to 5 April 2012 must have at least 260 full-rate PRSI contributions, and
  • people who turn 65 on or after 6 April 2012 must have at least 520 full-rate PRSI contributions. If the person has at least 260 full-rate PRSI contributions paid the balance can be made up with high rate voluntary contributions.

More information on retirement pension is available from the Department of Social Protection website.

Irish Widow's and Widower's (Contributory) Pension

Widow's or widower's (contributory) pension is a social insurance payment for both widows and widowers. It is not means-tested, and therefore entitlement is not affected by other income.

Period of Residence in Australia

Means a period of Australian working life residence, but excludes a period deemed to be a period of Australian residence in Article 8 of the Agreement.

PRSI

Pay Related Social Insurance (PRSI) contributions are paid by employees, employers and the self-employed (there are some exceptions). The amount paid is a percentage of the employee's reckonable earnings (i.e. gross pay less superannuation and permanent health insurance contributions, deducted under a net pay arrangement by the employer, which are allowable for income tax purposes). PRSI contributions are then used to qualify for Irish benefits.

More information on PRSI is available on the Department of Social Protection website.

PRSI Credits

Certain groups of people qualify for PRSI credits which will protect the person's future entitlement to social insurance payments. Only people who have previously worked and paid PRSI contributions are eligible for credits. Credits are also made when a person first starts work and to students in full-time education.

More information on PRSI credits is available on the Department of Social Protection website.

Widowed Person

Means, in relation to Australia, a person who stops being a partnered person because of the death of the person's partner, but does not include a person who has a new partner.

Last reviewed: 7 June 2010