The Guides to Social Policy Law is a collection of publications designed to assist decision makers administering social policy law. TheĀ information contained in this publication is intended only as a guide to relevant legislation/policy. The information is accurate as at the date listed at the bottom of the page, but may be subject to change. To discuss individual circumstances please contact Services Australia.

2.8.1 Court orders that vary assessments

Context

A parent can apply directly to a court if dissatisfied with a limited number of Registrar decisions under the CSA Act. A parent may also apply to a court if they believe that the AAT has made an error of law in its review of a Registrar decision. Courts can make a range of orders which affect a child support assessment.

Act references

CSA Act Part 7

CSRC Act Part VIII, Part VIIIB

AAT Act Part IVA

Description

A parent can apply directly to a court if they are dissatisfied with a limited number of Registrar decisions under the CSA Act. However, for most decisions it is necessary for the Registrar to have dealt with an objection about the decision and for the AAT to have undertaken a first review of the objection decision before the parent can make their court application. In those cases, the parent can only appeal to a court if they think that there has been an error of law (4.2).

Courts can make a range of orders which affect a child support assessment.

The court can make other orders affecting a child support case including stay orders.

For more information about the types of orders the court can make, see 4.3.2.

Last reviewed: